Verdict On My Yellow Phone Case

HTC10 in yellow case.

A few months ago, sick of constantly misplacing my phone in plain sight, I bought a case with yellow highlights. The reaction on Facebook was mixed. Some had tried themselves with poor results. No one gave it much chance.

My phone is an HTC10. It is a marvel of manufacturing, slender yet strong. The hard sided case makes it bigger, bulkier and a little industrial. I love it.

How weird is that? Shouldn’t I gravitate toward the slim? It just feels better this way.

As to the effectiveness of the case, I have good news and bad news. The bad news is I misplace the phone just as often as ever. The good news is I find it much faster. Yellow stands out.

All-in-all I’m very happy with my purchase. It works.

There’s This Law We Need

We have no recourse if the data is wrong. You can correct incorrect data on a credit report. You deserve the same ability with online data.

By now we’ve all come to the realization someone (something?) is looking over our shoulder every time we use a computer. Your moves are being tracked. Your value is being assessed. It’s the price we pay for everything we get free on the Internet.

It’s definitely creepy.

I’m not sure we need protection against data collection. Where we need it is in how that data gets parsed.

Your browsing data allows you to be categorized. Should you see ads from Saks or Fingerhut? Mercedes or Mazda?

We have no recourse if the data is wrong. You can correct incorrect data on a credit report. You deserve the same ability with online data.

I propose companies collecting data disclose the demographic categories they offer and where each of us fits in individually. Like a credit report we should have the ability to flag and remove incorrect data.

These categorizations affect your life in a big way. They shouldn’t be cloaked in secrecy.

I’m Conflicted

The guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) conducts strike operations against a target in Syria while in the Mediterranean Sea, April 7, 2017. The Porter conducted naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams)

I’m conflicted about our recent bombing of a Syrian airbase. Assad needed to be reminded the world is watching. The bombing was justified.

I wish it wouldn’t have been us who unilaterally launched the attack.

Through my adult life I’ve watched America insert itself in other nation’s business. We seldom make the situation better. Syria is a perfect place to make the wrong decision because there’s really no ‘good’ side in their civil war.

The raid should have been conducted by a coalition of Syria’s neighbors, folks with skin in the game. We sell them enough armaments. It’s not like they don’t have the hardware.

They are scared of the repercussions. No matter how good your intentions you will piss somebody off. We should be concerned too.

My opinion is out of step with the majority. In fact, I understand perfectly how those who support the president’s action feel.

It shouldn’t have been us.

I Am Very, Very Lucky

Throughout this whole cancer thing I’ve avoided posting the statistics. They’re really scary.

With my prognosis excellent it’s time to show how lucky I am.

Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate of all major cancers. 91% of pancreatic cancer patients will die within five years of diagnosis – only 9% will survive more than five years. 74% of patients die within the first year of diagnosis.

I am very, very, lucky. I’ll try not to forget.

OK — So What Does It Mean?

CT scan yesterday. Results today.

Waiting today was tough. There are only two results: Oh shit and OK for now.

Pancreatic cancer is considered incurable. It’s never really gone.

Incredible news! Unfortunately it changes nothing.

I’m still undergoing chemo in another 3-4 weeks. There will be more scans once or twice a year. And every time I will worry as I did today.

This is the surprising part of cancer. You can cure it, but you never get rid of it.

I’ve Been Scanned

Because my scan covered chest, abdomen and pelvis I needed two separate “contrast” liquids. One I chugged. Gawd, it’s awful. The other came via IV though my catheter port. When you’re scheduled for an IV any medical treatment seems a little more significant and bothersome.

GE CT scan. You’re transported in and out of the tube. It’s like a ride.

More treatment today. My oncologist thought this would be a good time to sneak a peak inside me, so off to the Medical Factory Outlet for a CT scan. We expect it will show no cancer.

A computerized tomography (CT) scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles and uses computer processing to create cross-sectional images, or slices, of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body. CT scan images provide more detailed information than plain X-rays do. – Mayo Clinic

The scan itself took a few minutes. It’s the prep that’s the killer.

Actually, it was forgetful Geoff first. I forgot to bring the doctor’s orders! I offered to say what was written (because no one fakes a reason to have a CT scan), but no. Twenty minutes round trip driving fast.

Because my scan covered chest, abdomen and pelvis I needed two separate “contrast” liquids. One I chugged. Gawd, it’s awful. The other came via IV though my catheter port.

When you’re scheduled for an IV any medical treatment seems a little more significant and bothersome.

I continue to be irrationally fearful of the port. Zero pain going in and a second or so coming out. I’m a baby where the port’s concerned.

Now comes the wait. I don’t see my oncologist for another few weeks. I’ll be writing his medical assistant asking for a preview when it’s in. Who wants to wait for this kind of news?