Wakodahatchee Wetlands (photos)

Thankfully, in spite of their department head approved write-up, Wakodahatchee Wetlands is a must see treasure! A boardwalk snakes over the swamp which is loaded with birds and varmints seemingly living in peace and harmony.

It’s impossible to understand the natural beauty of the Wakodahatchee Wetlands when all you get is the Palm Beach County Water Utilities Department prose.

Every day, the Palm Beach County Water Utilities Department’s Southern Region Water Reclaimation Facility pumps approximately two million gallons of highly treated water into the Wakodahatchee Wetlands. By acting as a natural filter for the nutrients that remain, the wetlands work to further clense the water.

Traditional methods for disposal of treated wastewater have included deep injection wells or ocean outfalls. More recent emphasis has been placed on highly treating and reclaiming wastewater. The Palm Beach County Water Utilities Department is a pioneer in the fields of wastewater treatment and reclaimed water distribution for irrigation purposes. The Wakodahatchee Wetlands are yet another example of the Department’s innovative and forward-thinking management philosophies.

Whatever.

It’s swampland. Treated waste water is piped into it. Nature flourishes.

Thankfully, in spite of their department head approved write-up, Wakodahatchee Wetlands is a must see treasure! A boardwalk snakes over the swamp which is loaded with birds and varmints seemingly living in peace and harmony.

With my friends Alyce & John and Ira & Merrill (plus three DSLRs) we set out to see what we could see.

8 thoughts on “Wakodahatchee Wetlands (photos)”

  1. One of my favorite spots to photograph birds; will be there for 4 days with a new 800mm lens in 3 weeks!
    Watch the rubber stripping of your car disappear if you head south and park in the Anhinga Trail parking lot. If you do plan to shoot there make sure you stop at the “Robert is Here” fruit stand to get a shake!

  2. Historically, for years the Palm Beach County area spent millions of dollars draining the swamps. When my family fist moved there in the 1950’s, there were many ‘reclamation’ projects designed to drain the swampland. Since then, they have experienced water recharge issues, salt water intrusion, and other bad effects of messing with the natural ecosystem.

    It’s nice to hear that the Water Utilities Department has turned that around and is taking advantage of the natural filter the swamps provide, and getting water back into the habitat.

  3. Beautiful photos and beautiful place, but not “wild.” Next time, try Loxahatchee Wildlife Refuge a short distance away on 441 South. We have so many wonderful places to visit down here! (resisted the urge to shout hello in the parking lot yesterday-same community as your parents šŸ™‚

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